If you were awarded the contract

If you have been awarded a contract and received an award notice from the procuring organisation, you should be aware that there is a ten-day standstill period. Before then, no agreement may be entered into. When the standstill period has expired, the agreement may be signed.

The information on this page concerns procurements in accordance with:

  • the Public Procurement Act (LOU)
  • the Act on Procurement in the Water, Energy, Transport and Postal Services Sectors (LUF)

Standstill period

A standstill period is in effect for no less than 10 days from the date the award notice was sent. During that period, the procuring organisation is prohibited from signing a contract. If the award notice is sent in a different way, such as via regular post, the standstill period shall be no less than 15 days.

The procuring organisation may apply a longer standstill period, but never less than 10 or 15 days from the date the award notice was sent.

The standstill period does not apply to direct awards. 

Standstill period (SV)

Term of contract

Throughout the entire term of the contract it is important to enter into dialogue with the procuring organisation to ensure successful collaboration.

 After having been awarded a contract and receiving the award notice, the supplier needs to be an active participant and enter into dialogue with the procuring organisation, in order to implement the agreement in the best way possible in the respective operations. Feel free to propose a start-up meeting where you can discuss, for example:

  • the obligations and rights of both parties
  • how to call off or order the product or service
  • how to implement the agreement at the procuring organisation
  • who will place orders at the procuring organisation
  • who the contacts are at the supplier’s company 

The Act on Electronic Invoicing as a Result of Public Procurement 

Since 2019, there is an Act on Electronic Invoicing as a Result of Public Procurement. For suppliers, this means that when you deliver to the public sector, an electronic invoice must be sent. 

Mandatory electronic invoice (SV)

As a supplier, you also need to keep track of important dates during the term of the contract, such as:

  • indexation
  • contract extension.

Contract follow-up

The contract can be followed up on the initiative of the procuring organisation in order to ensure that the supplier has fulfilled all the requirements and is invoicing as per the agreement. This can be done through:

  • regular follow-ups
  • internal and external auditors.  

A contract can also be followed up on the initiative of the supplier in order to develop their business or to use the contract as a reference for future assignments. It is helpful to be aware of challenges and problems in order to remedy faults and issues.

Follow up the contract (SV)

Changing contract and framework agreement

Public sector contracts cannot be changed indiscriminately. A contract or framework agreement cannot be materially changed. It is beneficial to keep in mind that if there is a change that is not permitted, it may constitute a prohibited direct award, and the contract or agreement may be invalidated.

The following changes can be made:

  • changes of lesser value
  • revision or option clause
  • supplementary orders
  • unforeseen circumstances
  • change of supplier
  • non-material changes.

Any changes must be approved by the procuring organisation.

Contract changes (SV)

Five suggestions to keep in mind during the term of the contract

  • Maintain a good business relationship – avoid gifts and dinner invitations. Maintain a dialogue with the procuring organisation throughout the term of the contract.
  • Take care to comply with all contractual terms.
  • Any changes must be approved by the procuring organisation.
  • Plan for the expiry of the contract.